The Questions which Postman ponders

“Why history and geography? Why not cybernetics and ecology? Why economics and algebra? Why not anthropology and psycho-linguistics? It is difficult to escape the feeling that a conventional curriculum is quite¬†arbitrary¬†in selecting the “subjects” to be studied. The implications of this are worth pondering.”

“What’s worth knowing? How do you decide? What are some . . . → Read More: The Questions which Postman ponders

Forcing Knowledge Into Students’ Heads

Is this what learning should look like?

Villemard's 1910 prediction of schools in the year 2000. Yeah, mash those books up!

In the year 2000, every classroom will have a giant blender. It’s a smoothie machine for learning, if you will. But the ingredients aren’t fruits, they’re books! Throw some books in this . . . → Read More: Forcing Knowledge Into Students’ Heads

In a Technopoly, to what end do we educate?

“Public education does not serve a public. It creates a public.” – Neil Postman, in The End of Education.

What’s the point of school? Why do we educate our youth? Postman explores these questions and much, much more in his thought-provoking look at our systems of learning, in the cleverly titled The End . . . → Read More: In a Technopoly, to what end do we educate?

The Relativity of Critical Thinking

In our Social Studies class (EDCP 331), we had a guest speaker from the Critical Thinking Consortium give a talk about how to embed critical thinking into our Social Studies lessons. I think that this is increasingly important in a digital age where information is at our fingertips; where Google and Wikipedia are the . . . → Read More: The Relativity of Critical Thinking

Growing Up Digital, Wired for Procrastination?

This New York Times cover story has inspired quite the debate. What effect is social media having on students? Are they too distracted by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and text messages to focus on their homework?

Don Tapscott, the author of Growing Up Digital and Grown Up Digital, had this rebuttal on the Huffington Post.

. . . → Read More: Growing Up Digital, Wired for Procrastination?

Grown Up Digital: The Net Generation as Learners

“Instead of focusing on the teacher, the education system should focus on the student.

Instead of lecturing, teachers should interact with students and help them discover for themselves.

Instead of isolating students, the schools should encourage them to collaborate.”

Don Tapscott, author of Grown Up Digital, on the education system.

This book analyzes the . . . → Read More: Grown Up Digital: The Net Generation as Learners