Learning About the Stars – The Power of Discussion at #edcampfv

During the Knowledge vs. Skills discussion at #edcampfv (the Ed Camp in Maple Ridge on Saturday, December 3 – see my first post on the Ed Camp here) there were a number of insightful comments made and questions raised. One particular anecdote shared by a teacher (whose name I did not catch, sorry) has . . . → Read More: Learning About the Stars – The Power of Discussion at #edcampfv

Knowledge, Skills, and the Great Conversation at #edcampfv

On Saturday, I attended my first ever Ed Camp at Garibaldi Secondary School in Maple Ridge. Ed Camps are often called un-conferences, in that they are similar to the more traditional professional development conferences teachers have attended for years, but have a less rigid agenda and are much more user-driven. The agenda is decided . . . → Read More: Knowledge, Skills, and the Great Conversation at #edcampfv

Education and Technology: The Link We Love?

I thought that the Graphic Science piece on the last page of the latest Scientific American magazine ( Dec. 2011 issue) was pretty interesting. I scanned the image in from a paper-based copy of the magazine, and then shortly afterwards realized that the graphic was also available, in a superior interactive version, on the SciAm website. . . . → Read More: Education and Technology: The Link We Love?

Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

I recently read a fun little book called Moonwalking With Einstein by Joshua Foer, who I just researched and realized is the younger brother of writer Jonathan Safran Foer (Everything is Illuminated, Eating Animals, and more). Despite its title, the book is not about Michael Jackson’s trademark dance move, nor Albert Einstein. The . . . → Read More: Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything

What can the Steve Jobs biography tell us about education?

The new Steve Jobs biography is an incredible read so far. Perhaps it’s because most of this is new to me (I’ve never been much of an Apple fan or followed the Steve Jobs story) or perhaps it’s because Walter Isaacson is an extremely engaging writer. Regardless of why, I’m greatly enjoying the read . . . → Read More: What can the Steve Jobs biography tell us about education?

The Google Effect and the so-called flattening of expertise

Review of The Google Effect (full PDF here)

Are Google, blogs, and wikis making us stupid?

Tara Brabazon contends that due to the nature of Google, blogs, and wikis, we are coming to value popularity more than quality, and as a result, we are seeing a flattening of expertise, which she coins The . . . → Read More: The Google Effect and the so-called flattening of expertise

Isaac Asimov’s Technophobia – why he feared the word processor

This is a review of Technophobia, an Isaac Asimov essay which appeared in 1982’s The Roving Mind. It’s an excellent collection of writing on all manner of topics: creationism and evolution in schools, the relationship between technology and science, and even beyond the solar system (and the present) in essays on space exploration prospects, the . . . → Read More: Isaac Asimov’s Technophobia – why he feared the word processor

Sir Ken Robinson at the Dalai Lama Center (or on Twitter: #sirkenyvr)

Sir Ken Robinson

Last night I attended Sir Ken Robinson’s talk at Vancouver’s Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education. During my bus ride home, I was surprised to find that many people had been tweeting about the talk using the hashtag #sirkenyvr, with some even going to White Spot to meet and . . . → Read More: Sir Ken Robinson at the Dalai Lama Center (or on Twitter: #sirkenyvr)

The Element by Sir Ken Robinson

Continuing to slowly make my way through Maria Popova‘s list of 7 Must-Read Books on Education, I recently picked up #2 on the list, The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything by Sir Ken Robinson. It only seemed fitting to read it this week, as I am going to see the man speak tonight . . . → Read More: The Element by Sir Ken Robinson

Inquiry-based reading (for pleasure) in education

Opinion: At least 20% of students’ readings should come from material which has been chosen by the students themselves.

Why did I choose 20% as the benchmark? I was partly inspired by Google’s now-famous employee policy, called “Innovation Time Off, where Google engineers are encouraged to spend 20% of their work time on projects . . . → Read More: Inquiry-based reading (for pleasure) in education